Archive

You can find the archived posts from the older version of the FHSAsia website pasted below.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2012: Job Announcement: Environmental or Business History at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Faculty Position in Environmental or Business History

The School of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, invites applications for a full-time faculty appointment in Environmental or Business History at the rank of Assistant Professor. The geographical area of specialization is open, and we particularly welcome candidates whose research area is related to the Asia-Pacific. The successful candidate should be able to teach undergraduate and postgraduate courses that address the history of the environment and/or business from global and comparative perspectives.

The appointment presents excellent opportunities for a scholar to contribute to the development of the new History programme at the University. Candidates should have a Ph.D., and demonstrate a commitment to excellence in research as well as teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

The University offers competitive remuneration packages commensurate with qualifications and experience, and also comprehensive benefits. Faculty members can expect generous support for research, including grants for travel and conferences. For further information about the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, visit: http://www.hss.ntu.edu.sg.

To apply, please refer to the Guidelines for Submitting an Application for Faculty Appointment (http://www.ntu.edu.sg/ohr/Career/SubmitApplications/Pages/Faculty.aspx) and send your application package (consisting of a cover letter, personal particular form, curriculum vitae, a statement on teaching as well as current and future research plans, the names and contact details of three referees, and a sample publication) to: History Search Committee, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, HR Office, 14 Nanyang Drive HSS-06-19, Singapore 637332

Email: HistorySearch@ntu.edu.sg

To receive full consideration, applications should be dispatched to the Search Committee by 31 December 2012. The successful candidate is expected to assume duty from August 2013 or earlier. Only shortlisted candidates will be notified.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012: [Teach 3.11] We need your input!

Teach 3.11 is upgrading and moving to a new server at the Humanities and Social Sciences Library of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. We’re planning to roll out a substantial redesign in January 2013 with better search features and greater technological capacity. Your input is important to us, so please contact us by the end of November 2012 or come to the FHSAsia meeting at HSS to suggest any improvements or new content that you would like to see. In the meanwhile, pardon our dust. Thank you!

– Teach 3.11 team

teach3eleven at gmail.com

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2012: Job Announcement: Two Positions at Heidelberg University

The cluster “Asia and Europe in a Global Context” at Heidelberg University is hiring two positions. Both applications are due 01 November 2012.

1. Research Scholar in Chinese Intellectual History: The three-year fixed term position is situated within the research project “Standards of Validity in Imperial Chinese Discourses.” The project is part of a collaborative research group exploring practices of argumentation in transcultural perspective. The successful applicant is expected to contribute to the research group’s objectives in collaboration with scholars in the history of logic and Buddhist Studies. Brief outlines of the research group and its subprojects can be found here: http://www.asia-europe.uniheidelberg.de/en/practices_of_argumentation/.

Candidates should hold a doctorate in Chinese Studies, Philosophy, History, or a related field at the time of appointment and show evidence of scholarly promise in the form of publications or other achievements. Proficiency in English as well as classical and modern Chinese is essential; research experience in East Asia is desirable. German is not required but German language classes are available upon request.

The position, which can be filled immediately, is primarily devoted to research but entails some teaching (one course per semester) and administrative duties. It is ranked at the TV-L 13 level of the German academic salary scale, which roughly corresponds to that of Lecturer in Britain, Assistant Professor in North America, and Maître de conférences in France.

To apply, send curriculum vitae, academic transcripts, outline of a relevant research project (2-3 pages), two letters of reference, and up to two written samples via email to Dr. Martin Hofmann at hofmann@asia-europe.uni-heidelberg.de. Review of applications will begin on 1 November 2012 and continue until the position is filled.

Heidelberg University is an equal opportunity/affirmative-action employer. In case of equality of qualification and suitability of applicants, the applications made by female researchers will be given preferential consideration. We also encourage and welcome applications from disabled persons

2. Research Scholar in East Asian Intellectual History: The three-year fixed term position is situated within the research group “Towards a Global History of Concepts” that aims to develop new ways of reconstructing conceptual migrations and entanglements. The successful applicant is expected to contribute to these objectives in close collaboration with colleagues in European and South Asian Studies. An outline of the research group’s focus and its subprojects can be found here: http://www.asia-europe.uni-heidelberg.de/en/global_concepts/.

Candidates should hold a doctorate in Chinese, Japanese or Korean Studies, History, Philosophy, or a related field at the time of appointment and show evidence of scholarly promise in the form of publications or other achievements. Proficiency in English and at least one East Asian language is essential; research experience in Asia is desirable. German is not required but German language classes are available upon request.

The position, which can be filled immediately, is primarily devoted to research but entails some teaching (one course per semester) and administrative duties. It is ranked at the TV-L 13 level of the German academic salary scale, which roughly corresponds to that of Lecturer in Britain, Assistant Professor in North America, and Maître de conférences in France.

To apply, send curriculum vitae, academic transcripts, outline of a research project (2- 3 pages), two letters of reference, and up to two written samples via email to Professor Joachim Kurtz at kurtz@asia-europe.uni-heidelberg.de. Review of applications will begin on 1 November 2012 and continue until the position is filled.

Heidelberg University is an equal opportunity/affirmative-action employer. In case of equality of qualification and suitability of applicants, the applications made by female researchers will be given preferential consideration. We also encourage and welcome applications from disabled persons.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012: Job Announcement: Modern South Asian and Imperial/Colonial History

Faculty Position in Modern South Asian and Imperial/Colonial History

The School of Humanities and Social Sciences at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, invites qualified academics to apply for a faculty position as Assistant Professor in Modern South Asian and Imperial/Colonial History. Applicants with interest in South Asian and imperial/colonial history, particularly the history of South Asia in global perspective, imperialism/colonialism, the Indian Ocean and the maritime world, Islam, and transnational history are particularly encouraged to apply.

The appointment presents excellent opportunities for a promising historian to contribute to the development of a new History programme at the University. Candidates should possess a PhD and demonstrate a commitment to excellence in research as well as teaching at both undergraduate and graduate levels.

The University offers competitive remuneration packages commensurate with qualification and experience, and also comprehensive benefits. The successful applicant can expect generous support for research, including grants for travel and conferences. For further information about the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, visit: http://www.hss.ntu.edu.sg/

To apply, please refer to the Guidelines for Submitting an Application for Faculty Appointment (http://www.ntu.edu.sg/ohr/Career/SubmitApplications/Pages/Faculty.aspx), and send your application package (consisting of cover letter, personal particular form, curriculum vitae, a statement on teaching as well as current and future research plans, the names and contact details of three referees, and a sample publication) to: History Search Committee, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, HR Office, 14 Nanyang Drive HSS-06-19, Singapore 637332

Email: HistorySearch@ntu.edu.sg

To receive full consideration, applications should be dispatched to the Search Committee by 30 September 2012. Only shortlisted candidates will be notified.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2012: Research Assistant Post: History of Indian Geology at the University of Kent

Please follow the link below for a detailed announcement of a three-year RA post for the Leverhulme trust funded project on the history of Indian geology at the University of Kent, UK. Note: the closing date for applications is 28 October 2012. http://jobs.kent.ac.uk/fe/tpl_kent01.asp?s=eziKhNSpCaRDiFfRax&jobid=37016,4556791572&key=31091393&c=612188022123&pagestamp=seyfgfsxhykjsijtcs

Job Announcement: Early Modern East Asian History at the University of Binghamton

The History Department at Binghamton University, State University of New York, is seeking a tenure-track assistant professor in early modern East Asian history with research competence in late imperial China (14th to 19th c.). We particularly welcome candidates whose research and teaching interests will complement the existing strengths of the department, including borderlands, trans-regional, and global history. Binghamton University is home to a growing Ph.D. program in East Asian history and a dynamic scholarly community in History and Asian and Asian American Studies.

The position will begin Fall 2013. Applicants must have their Ph.D. in hand by the time of appointment. Please submit your application electronically at http://binghamton.interviewexchange.com/ by November 26, 2012.  The application should include a CV, three letters of recommendation, two article-length writing samples and sample syllabi. If you have any questions about the position, please contact Dr. Fa-ti Fan (ffan@binghamton.edu), Chair, East Asian Search Committee, History Department, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY 13902. The History Department values diversity among its students, staff, and faculty and especially encourages women and minority candidates to apply. Binghamton University is an AA/EOE.

Job announcements: Two positions in the history of technology at the University of Pennsylvania

The Department of History & Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania is hiring two positions in the history of technology this year that may be of interest to scholars of the history of technology and/in Asia. The announcements are linked below:

1. Associate Professor or Professor in the History of Technology

2. Assistant Professor in the History of Technology

TUESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2012: Call for Papers – Beyond Integration: Reflections on Asian Medicines in the 21st Century (South Korea, 09/2013)

BEYOND INTEGRATION: REFLECTIONS ON ASIAN MEDICINES IN THE 21st CENTURY

The Eighth International Congress on Traditional Asian Medicine (ICTAM VIII) Changwon Exhibition Convention Centre (CECO), Changwon, Gyeongsangnamdo, South Korea, SEPTEMBER 9-13, Monday-Friday 2013

International Association for the Study of Traditional Asian Medicine (IASTAM)

-CALL FOR PAPERS- 

The International Association for the Study of Traditional Asian Medicine (IASTAM) will hold its Eighth International Congress of Traditional Asian Medicine in the Changwon Convention Exhibition Centre, Changwon, Gyeongsangnamdo, South Korea from September 9-13, 2013. The theme for the Eighth Congress will be “Beyond Integration: Reflections on Asian Medicines in the 21st Century.” The sub-themes of the Congress will be “Canonisation and Textual Authority,” “The Mainstreaming of Asian Medicine,” “Spirits,” “Efficacy and Effectiveness,” “Networks and Systems” and “Asian Medicines in Global Health and Development.” The Congress will provide a forum for the latest scholarship in Asian Medicine.

The International Association for the Study of Traditional Asian Medicine (IASTAM) is the world’s foremost community of scholars and practitioners devoted to understanding the history and contemporary practice of Asian medicines in all its many forms. IASTAM membership is made up of academics and clinicians, pharmacologists and epidemiologists, and many other stakeholders caring for the past, present and future of Asian medicines. IASTAM is also known for putting on the most exciting events and conferences in the field. Please join us for this exciting event in Korea that will feature many of the leading scholars and practitioners in the field of Asian Medicines.

The congress details may be found on the website of IASTAM www.iastam.org. As information comes to hand this page will be updated. Registration facilities will be made available there with a full description of the congress accommodation options, cultural activities, tentative schedule and a list of the presenters of papers.

Papers dealing with any aspect of Asian Medicine will be welcome, including both academic and those concerning clinical practice. The Organising Committee encourages broad participation from senior and junior scholars, and practitioners and students in the field of Asian Medicine. IASTAM is making a serious effort to strengthen the bridge between practitioners in the field and academia. Individuals may submit proposals for consideration in any of the sub-themes or separately from any of the sub-themes. Please go to the website to submit an abstract and follow the instructions.

Deadlines

31 January 2013  End of acceptance of submissions. 
30 April 2013  Notification of acceptance of submissions.
15 May 2013 Publication of preliminary programme.
31 May 2013  End of Very Early Bird Registration.
30 June 2013  End of Early Bird Registration. 
13 September 2013  End of Full Price Registration
Very Early Bird Registration  170 
Early Bird Registration  200 
Registration  230 
Student Registration  150 
Accompanying partner/companion  100 (includes two banquets and four lunches) 
Accompanying family member if under age 18 Free

Congress Fees (US Dollars)

Registration includes participation at all sessions, two dinner banquets and four lunches. Other meals will be self-catered. There are restaurants in the Convention Centre and also many restaurants in the near vicinity ranging from high-end dining to the cheap and convenient of good value. Registration also includes transportation within Korea to and from the venue in Changwon, as well as transportation for two day trips, one to the World Traditional Medicine EXPO in Sancheong and another to the Korean Institute of Oriental Medicine (KIOM) in Daejeon. Conference participants must also purchase IASTAM membership at the time of registration. As a member you will receive the most recent edition of our Journal, Asian Medicine. To join as a member of IASTAM, please do so on our website.

Please register on the Congress page on the IASTAM website www.iastam.org 

There will also be a post-conference optional programme of tours to Korean Medicine clinics in Seoul. This will be free of charge and will include free lunch. The duration may be one day or five to ten days of clinic observation by arrangement.

Cancellation Policy: All cancellations must be received in writing and emailed to James Flowers jflower6@jhmi.edu by 31 July 2013 for full refund. If a cancellation is made during the month of August 2013, 50% refund will be provided. No refunds for cancellation will be provided after August 31, 2013.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2012: 3.11 Virtual Conference: Looking back to look forward

3.11 Virtual Conference: Looking back to look forward, 11-12 March 2012

Begins 11 March, 8:00 a.m., Japan Standard Time (6:00 p.m., March 10, EST)

http://fukushimaforum.wordpress.com/conferences/

On the one-year anniversary of the triple disasters that devastated eastern Japan we welcome you to participate in an interdisciplinary online conversation, taking place 11-12 March 2012. The event will commemorate and discuss major issues and concerns raised – and still unsettled – related to the confluence of last year’s earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disasters.

Scholars from multiple disciplines, especially in the fields of history of science and technology and science studies, will lead an online discussion about this moment of rupture in history in a “virtual conference” co-sponsored by the Fukushima Forum and Teach 3.11. Taking this time to reflect deliberately on the harrowing tragedies of 3.11 and the ongoing recovery processes in and surrounding the Tohoku region of Japan, this meeting provides a forum for colleagues to show solidarity and exchange ideas, questions, and concerns related to issues that seem to have no immediate closure. Looking at the past to think about the future, this online conversation aims to facilitate thoughtful discussion about the triple disasters. In addition, it provides a space in which to consider how our multidisciplinary experiences in the historical, anthropological, and social studies of science, technology, environment, and medicine continue to inform our own understandings of issues, while also considering how this confluence of catastrophes presents a disciplinary rupture, so to speak, exposing the importance of familiarity with Asian languages and culture.

The format of the virtual conference will consist of a 48-hour period of open online dialogue and commenting in response to several essays that will be posted at the Fukushima Forum web site (please sign on at http://fukushimaforum.wordpress.com/conferences/ ). Scholars of any discipline are invited to contribute to this discussion on the Fukushima Forum blog, and/or in amore informal, conversational setting on the Fukushima Forum Google Groups site (please register at http://groups.google.com/group/fukushima-forum?hl=en ). Registration is open and ongoing through 12 March. Participants are also encouraged to submit their own topics and essays for conversation as well as to share information; moderation in both instances will be provided throughout by the co-sponsors.

Throughout the two-day online conference, comments may touch upon these and other topics:

— histories of tsunami, earthquakes, environment, geological sciences, ocean sciences, and nuclear science in Japan and in relation to other countries

— the impact of the disasters on Japanese citizens and communities, neighboring countries

— global and popular culture reactions to the disasters

— Japanese nuclear power in light of history of atomic bomb and postwar US occupation

— waste remediation and labor practices

— government management/public policy of disasters in Japan and beyond

— refugees and displacement, poverty, public health, and food safety in Japan

— commemoration and historical memory

— research agendas and research communities going forward

For more information, please contact Scott Gabriel Knowles at sgk23@drexel.edu

Co-Sponsors:  (a) Fukushima Forum consists of a group of scholars who have formed to exchange ideas around the science, technology, and society (STS) dimensions of the 3.11 disasters. (b) Teach 3.11 (www.teach311.wordpress.com) is a multi-language, online collaborative educational project that serves to introduce resources useful to “teach the disaster” through the lens of history of science, technology, environment, and medicine in global East Asia. Teach 3.11 is also a project of the Forum for the History of Science in Asia.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2012: Call for Submissions: FHSAsia Panel Endorsement for 2012 HSS Annual Meeting in San Diego

As an official Special Interest Group of the History of Science Society, the FHSAsia is able to formally endorse and sponsor *one* panel for the 2012 HSS Annual Meeting in San Diego. If you would like to submit your panel proposal to the FHSAsia for consideration for this sponsorship, please send the title and abstract of your panel, including the contact information for the panel organizer, the names of presenters, and brief abstracts of all of the included papers, to the FHSAsia Steering Committee at carla.nappi@ubc.ca by 19 March 2012. The Committee will aim to respond to proposals with a decision by 26 March, so that the panel that receives the endorsement may incorporate it into their HSS panel submission by the 02 April CFP deadline. Please feel free to email with any questions.

With all best wishes, Carla Nappi, on behalf of the FHSAsia Steering Committee

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2012: An STS forum on Fukushima, posting on behalf of Dr. Atsushi Akera, RPI

An STS Forum on Fukushima (website)

15 February 2012

Dear Colleagues: In the wake of Fukushima and the broader NE Japan Earthquake and Tsunami (Higashi-Nihon Dai Shinsai), many STS scholars are engaging in the debate over the lessons of the disaster.  This includes not only those working directly on Fukushima, but those in related areas such as engineering studies, expertise, nuclear policy, technological governance, disaster studies, and East Asian studies/STS, many of whom are interested in looking at Fukushima from a comparative perspective.

Following the 2011 Cleveland 4S/SHOT/HSS co-located meeting, several of us decided to work to assemble a sustained, international forum for conversations about the Fukushima nuclear disaster and the Higashi Nihon Dai Shinsai. Our hope is to help create a safe and productive place for dialogue that integrates Japanese and non-Japanese perspectives while also balancing academic studies with opportunities for eventual outreach and policy engagement.

With this message, we are hoping to introduce you to our efforts, and to invite you into this conversation. Among the things we would like to help accomplish are:

· Organizing an online discussion forum for (STS-based) academic discussions about Fukushima.

· Organizing a series of multi-day workshops, in Japan and the United States, for more intensive, transnational conversations about the disaster (including studies of the disaster in comparative perspective).

· Offering to help organize and/or diversify Fukushima-related sessions at 4S, SHOT, HSS, American Anthropological Association, and other venues. (See attached “call for papers,” for the 4S meeting; we will soon follow with similar announcements for other meetings.)

With the online discussion forum, we anticipate creating a place for scholars (primarily STS, but also in adjoining disciplines) to exchange self-introductions, post literature/review essays, and maintain discussion threads on topics ranging from expertise, to citizen science, to organizational dynamics and the historical/cultural background of the disaster. We have also developed the idea of the multi-day workshop into an NSF workshop proposal (the proposal is posted on the discussion forum). Please contact us if you would like to: a) Join the online discussion forum, b) Keep receiving announcements, including further calls for papers, and/or c) Join us as part of the planning group for this forum.

Best wishes, Atsushi Akera (akeraa@rpi.edu) Scott Knowles (sgk23@drexel.edu), on behalf of the “Initial Planning Group” for the STS Forum on Fukushima

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2012: AAS, Toronto 2012

Hi, Just wanted to call attention to the increasing number of Science / Tech-related panels for EA this year (as in the last several years), and hope to see some of you in Toronto later this year. The program is now up and available for viewing at the AAS site. – John

MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 2011: Teach 3.11: End of year reflection

Thank you to everyone at FHSAsia for making it possible to kick-start the Teach 3.11 project. This pilot project of the FHSAsia has been helping teachers, students, and scholars locate and share educational resources about the historical contexts of scientific and technical issues related to the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disasters that took place in Japan on 11 March 2011.

Many members of FHSAsia and the SHOT Asia Network have been involved since the project’s initiation in April to help highlight relevant scholarly works and teaching materials. We’d like to use this space in the Forum blog to send a hearty “Thank You!” to all our volunteers — undergraduates, graduate students, post-docs, and professors — who wrote annotations or translated material that currently appears on the project site. We’d also like to thank the EASTS journal for inviting us to introduce the project to a wider community and all of the teachers who have used (and continue to use) Teach 3.11 in their curricula.

Teach 3.11 will resume in late January 2012 with a fresh batch of annotations that will make the collective wisdom of scholars working at the intersections of history of science and technology and Asia even more accessible to teachers and students worldwide. Among our goals for 2012 is to build up Japanese, Korean, and Chinese translations of existing content on our site. To make this possible, Teach 3.11 needs more volunteers to write brief annotations (~300 words) or to translate existing material. Please spread the word and/or contact us at teach3eleven at gmail dot com.

Finally, Teach 3.11 would like to thank Christian Dimmer for his contributions as a volunteer multimedia editor as he stepped down in fall 2011 to spearhead the establishment of the Tokyo Chapter for Architecture for Humanity and to work on the long-term restructuring of Tohoku, in addition to teaching at three institutions in Japan. He leaves big shoes to fill, butif anyone would like to raise their hand and serve as a multimedia editor in 2012, please email lonaga at gmail dot com.

As 2011 sheds into the past and 2012 begins, please keep in touch with Teach 3.11. We remain eager to hear from new and returning volunteers about new items worth annotating (suggestions need not be limited to Japan nor disasters), general comments/ideas, and feedback about how you use the project site in your courses. This project exists so long as there is interest and a need, so your continued support and communication is greatly appreciated. Thank you again, and have a restful, rejuvenating, and safe holiday season.

Lisa, on behalf of the Teach 3.11 team

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011: Call for Applications: The Soon-Young Kim Studentship in the History of East Asian Science and Technology

The Trustees of the Needham Research Institute invite applications from suitably qualified candidates for a Soon-Young Kim Studentship in the History of East Asian Science and Technology, to be held in the University of Cambridge. The Studentship will be tenable from October 2012.

The purpose of the Studentship is to support students who have been admitted to work for a PhD degree in the University of Cambridge in the areas of study specified below. In the case of a student admitted directly to work for the PhD degree, the award shall be for three years at maximum. In appropriate cases, where the student is initially admitted to work for an MPhil preparatory to beginning work for a PhD, the Trustees may be prepared to consider making the award for up to four years at maximum. In all cases the continuation of the award from year to year will be conditional on the student making satisfactory progress in the view of the Trustees. The successful candidate will be given working space in the Needham Research Institute (www.nri.org.uk), which has unparalleled research facilities in the fields of the history of science, technology and medicine in East Asia. The Studentship is associated with Darwin College, and the successful award holder will normally be admitted to full membership of the College for the tenure of the Studentship.

The amount of the Studentship will consist of payment of university fees and college dues for the candidate, plus an amount for living expenses. Where appropriate, fees will be paid at the rate for non-EU students.

Priority in making awards of Studentships will be given to applicants who propose to carry out research in the following areas, which are given in order of priority:

(1) The history of science and technology in modern Korea

(2) The history of science and technology in modern Japan

(3) The history of science and technology in modern China, or the history of modern medicine in any of the above three countries

It is expected that candidates will apply for admission to a department of the University that can provide the specialist supervision and disciplinary training appropriate to the particular topic chosen. Suitable departments might include the Department of History and Philosophy of Science (http://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/), or the Department of East Asian Studies (http://www.ames.cam.ac.uk/deas/) . Candidates are encouraged to make informal enquiries of the relevant department at an early stage before making a formal application, in order to see whether their choice is appropriate. Candidates thinking of applying to a department other than the two named here should first contact the Needham Research Institute to discuss their plans.

The word ‘modern’ here designates the period after 1850, and ‘science’ is taken to include mathematics, whether pure or applied. Strong preference will be given to projects centering on the 20th century or later. Any holder of a Studentship who wishes to make a substantive change in the topic of his or her research after taking up the Studentship must first obtain the agreement of the Trustees, failing which the Studentship may be withdrawn.

Applications for this award will be treated separately from applications for admission to the University of Cambridge. Candidates should therefore:

(a) Apply as soon as possible for admission to the University of Cambridge in the normal way. For guidance, see the University website at http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/offices/gradstud/prospec/apply/; please address all queries about the University admission process to the appropriate part of the University, not to the Needham Research Institute. Candidates may however mention in their application that they are applying for this Studentship. Candidates should normally give Darwin College as their first choice of college. Candidates should note carefully the University’s demanding requirements in regard to English language ability: for instance, in IELTS applicants must have a band score of 7.0, with not less than 7.0 in speaking, listening and writing, and 6.5 in reading.

(b) Apply simultaneously to the Needham Research Institute for the Studentship. Candidates should send a full curriculum vitae, a detailed research proposal, and the name of two academic referees who are prepared to report in confidence on the candidate’s work. In most cases the best thing will be for the candidate to send the Needham Research Institute a hard printed copy of their University application, together with any further material necessary to give a clear impression of the research they intend to carry out. Candidates should ensure that they produce evidence that they possess the language skills required for the purpose of their research.

(c) The University offers other financial support for PhD applicants: candidates must also apply for any such schemes for which they are eligible at the same time as applying for this Studentship, and inform the Trustees of these applications and of their result.

All applications will be carefully considered. No announcement or notification of award of the Studentship will be made before University admission procedures have been completed and candidates have been told whether they have been given a place at Cambridge. The Trustees reserve the right to make no award if in their opinion no suitable candidate of sufficient merit applies. All enquiries and applications should be addressed to: The Institute Administrator, The Needham Research Institute, 8 Sylvester Road, Cambridge CB3 9AF, UK

email: admin@nri.org.uk

What was your HSS experience like?

This was my first time at HSS. My paper was part of the panel titled ‘Toward a Nuanced Understanding of Colonialism and Nationalism: Contestations and Confluences in the Making of Science’. In my paper titled ‘Art and Science in Botanical Catalogues of the East India Company’, I argued that botanical illustrations made by Indian artists for Scottish botanist William Roxburgh are examples of confluences between Indian courtly art and European botanical illustration styles and these were instrumental in making alien nature familiar through the homogenizing scientific representations of Indian flora. The panel was organized by Somaditya Banerjee, UBC and he was also one of my co-presenters along with Asif Siddiqi, Fordham University. The panel was chaired by Abha Sur from MIT who had a fantastic response for each of the papers. She thought that looking at science as knowledge and science as imperialism is a much more beneficial exercise than to think of science as freedom, especially in the context of constructing narratives of elite nationalisms through the progress in science. This issue was also discussed quite well in the papers of both my co-presenters. Abha’s commentary was very meaningful as it tied in quite well with some of the concerns that came out in the roundtable on ‘Engaging with Asia’. I thought that it was interesting that there seems to be two different concerns for historians of science writing about Asia: one that of breaking away from ‘Subaltern’ narratives and the other from the ‘Great Divergence Model’ and that any work that tries to address issues separately from these grand narratives poses problems. I also thought that Fa-ti Fan’s comments on conducting effective comparative studies of complementary societies was hugely relevant as it might become a model for understanding indigenous rationalities of science outside the strict confines of postcolonialism, nationalism or the great divergence model. I also attended the thought-provoking panel on Science and commodities, the sensational (I think) panel on Aethetics and Politics as well as the women’s Caucus breakfast. I attended the Caucus breakfast more out of curiosity but found it to be one of the most important social aspects of the conference. I found that the following three issues that were raised are quite relevant: 1) Question the very name of the Women’s Caucus and see if it needs to be changed to make it more inclusive to all genders 2) Currently there are no childcare options for those HSS members who are presenting or attending the conference. It would make many lives much easier if that was an option in future conferences. I certainly feel that the conference is not inclusive at many levels, this being one. 3) The very interesting issue of language – the question was whether languages other than English should be accepted for publications or essay prizes? Non-English speaking members of the Caucus agreed that only English should be used to make publications more accessible to all. Their point was that if French or Spanish are allowed then every other language should be allowed. The panel on Aesthetics and Politics was great because it explored the relationship between Media Studies and the History of Science, a very important emerging area that I thought can be used for studies on architecture, art, film and design and their relationship to science in modern India and in China. So, here’s a question to all other members: What was your HSS experience like? What is it that inspired you? How are you grappling with the issue of using alternate methodologies? Thanks, Khyati

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2011: APS News

Many thank to Grace Shen and Carla Nappi for organizing the FHSAsia forum, the recent meeting of the forum in Cleveland, and this website. In the spirit of keeping an active dialog going at this blog, I would like to share a guest editorial that I wrote for the American Physical Society’s newsletter (APS News 11/2011 issue) on “China, Sputnik, and American Science”: http://www.aps.org/publications/apsnews/201111/international.cfm.

In the editorial, I argue that the challenges facing the US due to the rise of China and India bear some resemblance to those arising from the Soviet launching of the Sputnik satellite in 1957, but the present situation, with close US-China ties in many areas and with the need for the two countries to work together on critical global problems, also call for moving beyond Cold War thinking and for strong scientific and technological collaboration. Your comments will be most welcome. – Zuoyue Wang

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2011: Asia in Cleveland

About a week before the joint conferences in Cleveland, Carla Nappi shared a rough guide to Asia-related panels and papers at HSS/SHOT. (Thanks, Carla!) Topics ranged from the Fukushima disaster to the treatment of emotional disorders in East Asian medicine, from debates over forensic knowledge in 20th-century China to the use of mechanical clocks in 19th-century Japanese cartography, from agricultural modernization in India to environmental disease in Korea. There were too many for one person to attend, but the ones I did were fascinating and thought-provoking. Several days after Fa-ti Fan’s talk, I am still wondering what weather patterns mantou-shaped clouds augur. In addition to presenting a paper and panel-hopping, I also enjoyed meeting other Asia scholars at the FHSAsia lunch on Saturday. Over cracker jack and mini hot dogs, we learned about the new FHSAsia website, which promises to provide resources for networking, teaching, syllabi development, conferences, job and post-doc searches, and more.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2011: Science Studies Dissertation Reviews

Many thanks for inviting us to the FHSAsia blog. This is a wonderful resource. We are also excited to bring the attention of FHSAsia members to the forthcoming launch of “Science Studies Dissertation Reviews,” set to go live in Winter 2012. In the tradition of the Dissertation Reviews project, the new site will feature friendly, non-critical overviews of recently defended and unpublished dissertations in Science Studies – history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology of science, medicine, and technology broadly conceived, both inside and outside of Asian Studies! 25 dissertations are currently under review, with more to come. If you are interested in reviewing for the new site, or having your dissertation reviewed, please contact the editors at dissertationreviews@gmail.com. And for more information please visit us here.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2011: Thanks Grace!

Thanks for setting this up, Grace. A wonderful opportunity to keep in touch. Phil

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2011: Hello, Cleveland!

I’m a first-time visitor to the state of Ohio. It is not the infamous Polish Boy that brought me here, but rather the joint meetings of the History of Science Society (HSS), Society for the History of Technology (SHOT), and the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S). I’d like to thank the committee who thought to host the opening reception at the Great Lakes Science Center. Along with friends and colleagues, I experimented with hands-on exhibits, that “satisf[ied] and delight[ed] the curious scientist in each of us.” The Science Center boasts 100 such exhibits. I think I tried my hand at nearly all of them, though I did miss the hang glider simulator (the line was too long). The bubbles were a big hit, as was the self-reflecting kaleidoscope. I was delighted to have a science museum specialist as a personal guide, who explained the exhibits and layout of the museum in an incisive and entertaining manner. The shuttle buses provided convenient transport to and from the hotels. Despite the crowds, the wait time for a shuttle was relatively short. This was fortunate, given Cleveland’s chilly temperatures.